What It is Prefer to Be a Black Girl Avenue Fashion Photographer

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What It's Like to Be a Black Woman Street Style Photographer

In the past decade, bloggers, influencers and street style stars have opened the once mysterious and elitist world of the fashion industry. This change was supported by those behind the lens, the street style photographers who captured the looks of everyday people as well as the fashion glitterati during fashion weeks around the world. Behind the scenes of these memorable moments of the Fashion Week there is often a style star in front of the flashing lights of 10 or 20 photographers from major agencies and publications, who strive for the perfect shot. Street style photographer Seleen Saleh is a veterinarian of Fashion Week and she stands out as a black woman in the boys' club for fashion photography. We had the pleasure of chatting with Saleh as she celebrates the publication of her new coffee table book. Street culture – the first of its kind to be published by a black woman – documents the street style of BIPOC creatives in the fashion and entertainment industry.

Saleh admits that the street style scene can be very aggressive. Photographers have mentioned physical jockeying for positions in the photo pits during runway shows.

Publishing a book during a pandemic is not an easy task. Even though she was stressed because the publication dates were postponed and the promotion plans changed, Saleh feels afterwards Street culture came out at the right time. "My book was created to inspire! It was created to celebrate everyone in it and to create a space where we can be seen. It is ironic that it came out at this time when people got to the basics returned when it came to style, "she said.

The February fashion month may have been the last of its kind for the foreseeable future. With much of the fashion and creative industries working from home, there will be fewer trips in future fashion weeks, and Saleh predicts that this will affect street style. "I think the financial ramifications that have affected most of us will affect what people wear to shows. I think this will lead to an upswing in individual style and upcycling or vintage trends again People will want a more realistic view of street style and less commercial. "

As long as Knowles by Seleen Saleh

Editorial and street style recordings for publications such as British Vogue, Beings, and PeopleSeleen Saleh has many years of experience in the male-dominated world of fashion photography. Saleh appears alongside photographers such as Tommy Ton, Scott Schuman and Phil Oh, and admits that the street style scene can be very aggressive. Photographers have mentioned physical jockeying for positions in the photo pits during runway shows. Outside of the venues, Saleh states that "there can be a bit of sexism depending on who you photograph if it stops for you," and mentions that it has been overlooked by many. Fortunately, Saleh is looking for such a broad and diverse spectrum of muses that those who have passed her have left no void. "I think photography has a very powerful way of influencing and communicating with people around the world. When used on purpose, it can make changes that reveal humanity and speak to people in a way that words can possibly do can't. It has the power to move a mind. I hope that someday my work can carry that weight for someone, "said Saleh.

With the growing influencer culture and brand partnerships that dominate the street style culture of Fashion Week, Saleh has found more variety than she looked beyond the regular guests of the industry.

Scroll through the pages of Street cultureWith his photos in New York City, you will find that Saleh's images are actually moving. It is a colorful celebration of creative BIPOC, from international celebrities like Solange Knowles to magazine editors, publicists and people, that Saleh saw on the street that radiated this mood. Saleh not only focuses on the well-known "Who is Who" in the fashion scene, like many other street style photographers. With the growing influencer culture and brand partnerships that dominate the street style culture of Fashion Week, Saleh has found more variety than she looked beyond the regular guests of the industry. Saleh photographed a weekly street style summary for Essence.com, which gave her the creative freedom and flexibility to find and photograph a variety of muses. She is proud to present creative people in the black diaspora. "I think our culture shapes the fashion and beauty industry," she said. "For me and the people I photograph, it's more of a lifestyle. It's a way of life and an integral part of who we are. It comes from our families, our upbringing, our heritage and our lineage."

Maybe Street culture will be a reference book for large fashion houses. It's released at a time when fashion consumers want brands to pay homage and contributions to their inspirations – think of Dapper Dan's Gucci collaboration. Saleh's book Street culture Explore culture at the heart of street style photography in an urban setting. From natural hair to intuitive cultural style, Saleh's photographs are a 360-degree celebration of the BIPOC.

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